D is for Drongo, fork tailed drongo

D

I am not a knowledgeable stiff-neck (birder).  I like the very distinctive birds which are easy for me to identify.  The fork-tailed drongo (Dicrurus adsimilis), is one of these.  It is both common and widespread and is found in open bush so they are easy to spot.

Fork tailed drongo, photo by Raymond Phillips (used with permission).

Fork tailed drongo, photo by Raymond Phillips (used with permission).

The male is mainly glossy black, although the wings are duller. It is large-headed and has the forked tail which gives the species its name. The female is similar but less glossy. The bill is black and heavy, and the eye is red. The fork-tailed drongo is 25 cm long. It has short legs and sits very upright whilst perched prominently, like a shrike. It flycatches or take prey from the ground and is attracted to bush fires.

The call is a metallic strink-strink. The fork-tailed drongo in Africa are capable of using deceptive mimicked alarm calls to steal food from birds and animals such as meerkats.

This posting is one of a series on animals and birds of the Kruger National Park which is my theme for the 2015 A-Z Blogging Challenge.

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About moirads

Clergy person, theatre and music lover, avid reader, foodie. Basically, I write about what I do, where I go and things I love (or hate).
This entry was posted in A-Z Challenge 2015, Ecology and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to D is for Drongo, fork tailed drongo

  1. Attracted to brush fires? Is it a pyro-bird? Cool little bird. Since I’m not a birder I find this type of study astounding.

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