May Day (Mayday) reflections – The world in the Christian

May Day.  A public holiday in South Africa for Worker’s Day, where work is celebrated by not doing any.  In the northern hemisphere its festivities mark the start of warmer weather and the growing season.

It is also, however, when written as one word, “Mayday”, an internationally recognised distress signal.  Used primarily by travellers, particularly mariners and aviators, it is always given three times in a row (“Mayday Mayday Mayday”).

My morning devotions, taken completely randomly and not for a set date, turned up the following quote:

It is not the ship in the water but the water in the ship that sinks it. So it is not the Christian in the world but the world in the Christian that constitutes the danger. Anything that dims my vision of Christ, or takes away my taste for Bible study, or cramps my prayer life, or makes Christian work difficult, is wrong for me, and I must, as a Christian, turn away from it.” ~J. Wilbur Chapman

I am guilty of this one.  As a Christian who consciously strives to live in the world, I constantly court danger that “the world” will become more important to me than God. And it frequently does.  Maybe I mean that only sometimes it does not?

For a Christian “the world” is simply summed up in the above quote.  It is anything that dims the vision of Christ.  For me specifically it is probably the hectic round of theatre, music, books, work and friends. I all too often forget that all of these should be constantly evaluated by the “Light of the world”.

Sinking Ship

My prayer is that I will follow the example of Christ in being a “light to the world” rather than taking on the world and sinking in it.  While I live in the world I should never forget that I view myself primarily as a citizen of the Kingdom of God.

 

 

 

 

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About moirads

Clergy person, theatre and music lover, avid reader, foodie. Basically, I write about what I do, where I go and things I love (or hate).
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