Marco Cianfanelli’s Seed at Standard Bank, Rosebank

I was fortunate to be invited on 28 August 2013 by Standard Bank to view their new art acquisition, Seed by Marco Cianfanelli, at their new offices at 30 Baker Street, Rosebank, Johannesburg.

Seed by Marco Cianfanelli

Seed by Marco Cianfanelli

The building itself is rated five stars for “green” design from the Green Building Council of South Africa because it was designed to maximise environmental sustainability, making use of rain water harvesting, air cooled chillers, a series of 15 lifts and 30 escalators to ensure efficient movement through the building, glass curtain wall, energy generation, energy efficiency and recycled building materials.   The building has two buildings of 9 and 11 floors east and west of the public piazza in which Cianfanelli’s artwork is installed.  There is also an urban garden the size of a rugby field, 420 trees, indigenous flower gardens and a lawn above the five floors of parking.

One of 229 panels pigmented by sand from various parts of Africa, laser cut images.

One of 229 panels pigmented by sand from various parts of Africa, laser cut images.

The media were addressed by Marco Cianfanelli who explained the briefing, designing, creating and installing processes of Seed.  It measures 34.33 metres in height, 9.58 in width and 8.55 in depth.  Seed has 229 plywood panels with laser cut designs, including various maps of Africa, and it weighs 1.5 tons.  Sand was imported from all over Africa and the plywood is pigmented by this sand.

Seed hangs from the ceiling of the atrium.  It was installed without using scaffolding.

Seed hangs from the ceiling of the atrium. It was installed without using scaffolding.

Seed, like all Marco Cianfanelli’s work, is intriguing and thought-provoking.

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About moirads

Clergy person, theatre and music lover, avid reader, foodie. Basically, I write about what I do, where I go and things I love (or hate).
This entry was posted in Art Exhibitions, Ecology, Johannesburg, South African Culture and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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